We make kids talk!

Our motto at ‘Sam and Mel’ is “We make kids talk”. This concept guides us in the design and execution of our video English lessons. If a lesson scene or exercise will encourage children to talk, it will be included. If not, we will not use it.

Our national newspaper recently published a front-page article whose headline is “New Zealand pupils struggling to speak”. The article starts by saying “Fewer children starting school can speak in sentences, prompting an investigation by education chiefs.”

This article would not be so surprising if it were referring to the thousands of new immigrant children who arrive on our shores every year. However, the article points out that “the problem is among native English-speaking pupils”, hence the concern.

How is it that children of 5 years of age cannot speak in sentences using their own native language? One reason put forth in the article is that children are using electronic devices and gadgets too much and that their parents are not talking to them enough.

The article includes tips for parents to engage their children in conversational activities (these are included at the end of this article). Although these activities are undoubtedly positive strategies that will compensate for the time spent on devices, the fact is that children will continue to spend a lot of their free time on electronic devices.

Given this reality, we at Kids Talk Media realise that ‘if you can’t beat them, then join them’. We encourage the use of devices in a way that will have a beneficial effect on children. In our business, that means encouraging them to speak in English.

Tony Gallagher Tony Gallagher

We make kids talk!

Our motto at ‘Sam and Mel’ is “We make kids talk”. This concept guides us in the design and execution of our video English lessons. If a lesson scene or exercise will encourage children to talk, it will be included. If not, we will not use it.

Our national newspaper recently published a front-page article whose headline is “New Zealand pupils struggling to speak”. The article starts by saying “Fewer children starting school can speak in sentences, prompting an investigation by education chiefs.”

This article would not be so surprising if it were referring to the thousands of new immigrant children who arrive on our shores every year. However, the article points out that “the problem is among native English-speaking pupils”, hence the concern.

How is it that children of 5 years of age cannot speak in sentences using their own native language? One reason put forth in the article is that children are using electronic devices and gadgets too much and that their parents are not talking to them enough.

The article includes tips for parents to engage their children in conversational activities (these are included at the end of this article). Although these activities are undoubtedly positive strategies that will compensate for the time spent on devices, the fact is that children will continue to spend a lot of their free time on electronic devices.

Given this reality, we at Kids Talk Media realise that ‘if you can’t beat them, then join them’. We encourage the use of devices in a way that will have a beneficial effect on children. In our business, that means encouraging them to speak in English.

Tony Gallagher Tony Gallagher

Happy Customers

Hello, Your videos are fantastic. My 4-year-old French-Canadian grand-daughter is making remarkable progress using your method.

Elaine Biron, Quebec, Canada


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